Note 1.1

Jino PARK's arts work note

Archive for the ‘Dharma Tree’ Category

Communi – tree

leave a comment »

Advertisements

Written by jinopark

July 12, 2011 at 10:03 pm

Posted in Dharma Tree, Statement

Meditation on the Artist Jino Park By Myongbon, Buddhist Monk

leave a comment »

Meditation on the Artist Jino Park
By Myongbon, Buddhist Monk

Om¹

As the Universe’s door opened, the light of Purusha², the pure spirit, was lost. The place left by the light was occupied by Prakrti³, the essential desire. The period of purity receded, and the period of desire unfolded. The pure souls, who fell asleep in the snow-covered Himalayan Mountains, seeped into the good earth and became the spirits of the trees. They dreamed new dreams within trees and spent a long time waiting. The humans who lived the period of desire could not control their own desires and fell to lust, folly and fury. They forfeited the homogeneous reason and were driven by the destructive original nature. Though their limbs were torn to pieces, they could not escape from the sea of desire.

Artist Jino Park fares the path. Jino Park the artist dreams of Utopia. He is an artist who, while living on this parched earth, dreams of the nirvana lurking behind the dark desires of this age where man’s pure spirit is lost. He has passed through the Taklamakan desert and climbed over the snowy Tienshian Mountains. Whatever hardships stood before him could not cool his passion as a seeker. Finally he met Bodhidharma. However, this was no longer a pure Bodhidharma. Bodhidharma had chosen the world of man’s desire instead of the spiritual world. The Bodhidharma he faced had bursting eyes of lust; his ears were filled with the turbid sounds of this world; his mouth was benumbed with the sweet taste of honey. It seemed the pure Bodhidharma was nowhere to be found. Instead of searching for a pure Bodhidharma, Park had as his companion a painful reality and a severe pain. Park suddenly contemplated his own inside, and looked back over the long period that had brought him to that point in time. He had fallen into a deep meditation reminiscing the seeker who had sat under the tree of enlightenment in Bodhgaya⁴ of ancient India. In the deep night when his mind became serene like the ocean and the pure white moon was out in the sky, he saw Bodhidharma in a flower. It brought him sheer ecstasy and joy. He had finally found a pure Bodhidharma. A ray of dawn emanated from the white hair between the eyebrows on Bodhidharma’s face. A spirit of purity took its place in the warped eyes of Bodhidharma. A gentle smile arose over Bodhidharma’s lips. Numberless flowers of the earth began to bloom over his head. Park thus found Bodhidharma by deserting Bodhidharma.

Park met the lucid smile of the pure spirit in the age of desire. Park was an artist who looked inside himself. In all manner of burning desires of reality, he put to rest his own desires, and started on his way in search of the pure spirit he had lost in the beginning, finally rediscovering Bodhidharma at the end of his journey. The Bodhidharma Park met had shed the endless desire, clinging, and attachment of this world. There was no more desire in Bodhidharma’s face. Bodhidharma had become a flower that showed the pure world. Bodhidharma’s eyes were calmer than a deep lake, Bodhidharma’s mind had merged with the pure spirit.

There he stood. The earth where Buddha had achieved a still nirvana under the tree of enlightenment, the mother earth Bodhidharma encountered after crossing the Yangtze river riding on reeds; there, on that earth Park recognized the clear and pure spirit. Now in the garden, where he rediscovered the lost spirit, there stands a pine-nut tree amidst life, which passes like morning dew, water foam, fantasy and haze. Through that pine-nut tree, Park communicates with nature, meets the tree’s spirit, and merges with the universe. He has entered such a world of purity. The moment he realizes that the spirit is one with the universe, then and there he finds Bodhidharma. And in that particular place, the tree’s spirit stands. Jino Park is not to be found there any longer, however.

Footnotes:
¹ Om: A sacred phrase considered to be the greatest among Buddhist mantras.
² Purusha: An Indian metaphysical concept, particularly in Vedic religious beliefs.
³ Prakrti: A material principle, in contrast to Purusa, which is a purely spiritual principle.
⁴ Bodhgaya: A village of the Bihar state in Northeast India.

Written by jinopark

March 25, 2010 at 11:02 am

Posted in Dharma Tree

Dharma Tree – a cultural shock By Woo-sik Kang

leave a comment »

Jino Park’s Solo Exhibition of Dharma Trees
-Dharma Tree – a cultural shock

By Woo-sik Kang, poet, literary critic, and Professor emeritus of
Sungkyunkwan University

It’s March. Spring sunlight has come to the place where I live. I move the chair out to the veranda and I gaze at the sun. I don’t gaze at the sun for any particular reason, I do it naturally because I love spring sunlight. It’s like welcoming the spring with my mind resembling a tabla rasa. With my mind emptied, and my soul dismissed, I suddenly wonder how Bodhidharma, who is here now in this land, would usher in the spring season.

My wonder was occasioned by artist Jino Park’s solo exhibition “Dharma Trees.” The strange but attractive title, “Dharma Trees”, was immediately inscribed in my brain and prompted me to go and see the exhibition. The Dharma trees which Park brought from America have been planted in several places in Seoul. I found it in Gallery Pig in Cheondamdong. And I’ve heard the welcome springtime news that they were being planted in the Pyeongchangdong branch of the Foreign Exchange Bank, in the lobby of Baikam Art Hall in Samsungdong, and in Gilsang Temple in Sungbukdong. I traveled quite a distance to see the Dharma tree at the Foreign Exchange bank in Pyeongchangdong.

In one word, Jino Park’s solo exhibition of Dharma trees provided a fresh cultural shock. Like many other people, I’ve seen Bodhidharma paintings perhaps more than any other Buddhist paintings. My experience as a spectator has accumulated to shape an idee fixe in me. I’ve formed a certain notion that Bodhidharma painting is executed with one bold brush-stroke and in forceful but light coloring with ample margins. I’ve seen numberless conceptualized or fixated Bodhidharmas, and Bodhidharmas which could not escape from being Bodhidharmas. The Bodhidharmas I’ve met before were Bodhidharmas and nothing other than Bodhidharmas. They were Bodhidharmas which could not shed their religious roots. I could not but feel that they were Bodhidharmas too preoccupied with Buddhism and did not quite reach the level of perfection as art work. From among the innumerable episodes about Boddhidharma circulating among people, my favorite is the remarks about Bodhidharmas’s enlightenment : “Buddhas or Bodhisatvas don’t regard body as body or life as life so that they may be able to pursue the Dharma.” Numberless Bodhidharma paintings lacking such enlightenment have assailed our world. They were Bodhidharma pictures that were commonplace and disappointing.

Jino Park’s Bodhidharma paintings feature an entirely new Bodhidharma. It is a Bodhidharma I’ve never seen before. It is a Bodhidharma nobody would call Bodhidharma. Here is a Bodhidharma which demonstrates Park’s unconventional forte as an artist and which has imbibed a certain creative life force. It is a Bodhidharma who was not born in India, but was born in Korea, stayed in America, and then came back to Korea. It is not a Bhodhidharma that was painted in conventional ink coloring. Park’s Bodhidharma emerges through digital printing like a latterday Bodhidharma. It is Park’s unique Bodhidharma drawn with pen, for which the artist chose the colors and shades using the computer, and which appeared in variegated daylight. It is a global Bodhidharma. In his Author’s Note, Park describes Bodhidharma’s birth as follows:

It’s Bodhidharma that I encountered while gazing into the darkness for a long time. Bodhidharma appeared to me like a bountary between dark and light, beautiful and ugly, life and death. In order to portray this peculiar saint, I’ve attempted to paint a portrait of a bad man made up of all the beautiful things of this world. This attempt led me to certain lights and colors for the first time in a long period of time and I began to draw trees. I was drawn more and more to trees.

I’m thrilled by his motive for drawing Bodhidharma as a “portrait of a bad man made up of all the beautiful things of this world.” I’ve known through his previous solo exhibitions that, like an artist who had studied video or performance arts while working towards his ENSAD Diploma (2003) from École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs, or his DNAP Diploma from École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts Paris-Cergy-Pointoise, in France, he was avant-garde and an experimentalist. Yet I guess that he has made a certain bold decision as an artist before plunging into the world of Bodhidharmas. In other words, Park’s Bodhidharma is not a conventional one but is an entirely new one portrayed with diverse tones and colors resulting from a considerable amount of time, labor and agony on the part of the artist. The solo exhibit held at the gallery of Munwha Ilbo last year was titled “Labyrinth.” It represented the Knossos labyrinth and a diverse world of myths based on Greek mythology. It symbolized the direction of life of modern man fumbling his way about in a labyrinth similar to that of the age of myths. Carrying the Greek myths forming an axis of the Western culture and civilization, Park has come back to the Oriental world. I see a contemporary Baudelaire in the Bodhidharma (“a portrait of a bad man made up of all the beautiful things of the world.”). I see a Baudelaire who an epoch earlier had alarmed the existing poetic scene with his book of poems Flowers of Evil, eulogizing the esthetics of evil. As we do in Beaudelaire’s essays about Picasso, so in Jino Park’s paintings we witness unusual literary imagination and poetry. Park demonstrates a unique artistic spirit in his pursuit of an esthetics of a brave new world; His paintings do not simply represent a return from Western to Oriental esthetics, but his paintings unfold a world where East and West converge and criss-cross.

As Jino Park has stated, he is a man of boundary—a man of boundary between dark and light, beautiful and ugly, life and death, East and West, myth and religion. Bodhidharma is the incarnation of a world embracing both West and East that Park has seen and surveyed. Park is a man of boundary like Baudelaire. Let us look closely at Park’s Bodhidharma. The historical Bodhidharma looked wild to start with. In order to attain the Way, he had faced the brick wall, which was more severe than the prison, for nine long years. More than that, he cut out his eyelids to chase away sleep, looking dreadful with his gaping eyes. Common sense renders him a strange man somehow. To attain the Way, he mutilated himself and sat for 9 years facing the wall, shackling himself like a mad man. His was a personality with demonic tendencies. Now Park has made him look even worse. He has created an ugly and dreadful evil man with corroding and rotting skin. Incidentally, why do artists willingly create models of characters that an ordinary person would shun forthwith? The literary term for such a phenomenon is “Philoctetes Inflammation.” Philoctetes was a master archer of Greece. He had the bad luck of getting his foot bitten by a viper during the campaign for Troy. His bitten toe was immediately inflammated and decayed and stank terribly, repelling people. Because of his inflammation, he was eventually expelled to an uninhabited island for ten years. However he was an indispensable man for the campaign to take Troy. In the end, they had to call him back to the campaign because they needed a master archer more than anything else. Many works of art today portray situations like this. They are intended to warn and shock the reader about such dread diseases as well as to divulge the absurdity of the modern world. There’s this paradox that, even if society may treat an artist with low esteem, it needs his artistic creativity, even if unsavory. Park’s Bodhidharma may well be the embodiment of Philoctetes Inflammation lurking in the artist’s subconsciousness.

Park’s Bodhidharma, though embodying certain demonic beauty, has been painted in very beautiful, fanciful and often mysterious colors. His Bodhidharma’s face resembles the labyrinth or the treasure box that appear in children’s treasure-hunting. They may contain stars, seas, burning deserts, flowers and leaves of grass. Locks of hair may wave like thickly wooded forests. The whole cosmos exists in the face, creating order out of chaos as in the times of the Genesis. Like the young Maori men we encounter in some South Pacific islands with their whole face tatooed with unknown signs and patterns, they smack of shamanism. Diverse digitally printed colors cover Bodhidharma’s face. At the same time, there is a sense of lightness and humor as in some American art. Among these elements, Bodhidharma’s eyes look mysterious. One eye expands to a circle (infinity), a big star of an eyeball looms like a symbol. The other eye is filled with several layers of a circular miniature cosmos. I meet an infinite cosmos in the unbalanced eyes. The eye with the star-eyeball represents an enlarged cosmos from among the several layers of cosmos in the smaller eye. Besides, the minute dots look like sperms or eggs of cosmos yet to be born or hatched. They offer fun like cartoons; like philosophical or religious ideas, they may evoke diverse notions for different viewers. Looking at the Bodhidharma painted by Park, I wonder how lucky I’d be if I had such amusing yet profound eyes like Bodhidharma. How nice it would be to have such eyes to look through the future, and foretell such things as human destiny. In Buddhism, they say everything is created by the mind.

Subsequently, Park moves from Bodhidharma the man to the world of trees. If Bodhidharma represnts the outer world, all the phenomena of the outer world constitute a record of the inside. One of the elements of the inner world emerges outside, Bodhidharma the man becomes an inner being residing within the tree. At one time or another, I wondered why a tree has been looked upon as a sacred being. Man’s worship of the tree can be noticed everywhere. The Korean foundation mythology surrounding Tan-gun features an oak as a holy tree; During the Shilla Kingdom, kings roamed through famous mountains to hold religious rituals. In our villages even today we often meet sacred trees. These cults or beliefs do not exist in one country alone. Like universal legends they are ubiquitous throughout the world. Trees which are regarded as cosmic trees generally are located in the central areas of a country. When in human history did man begin to worship the tree as a sacred being? What exactly happened between man and the tree? And I was made to wonder like a child whether there was a period of time when the tree (not as mere plant life) ruled over man with tremendous power. In such circumstances the tree may have been a mobile organism. Recently, I saw the movie “Avatar” where I thought I witnessed the actualization of what I had imagined so far. A giant tree stood in the midst of the village inhabited by a tribe called Nabi, controlling and dominating everything silently, and fought human beings attempting to remove it.

The Dharma tree Park has created assumes such a sacred appearance. Viewing Dharma trees, seeing Bodhidharma become a tree, and Bodhidharma and the tree merging into the Dharma tree, I was curious how much the artist has imagined about the tree, being reminded of Park’s Author’s Note.

They say to sleep is none other than to experience a mini-death. Each day we fall asleep and die, each day we wake up and revive. It is said the Korean word “Saram” (meaning man) is another way of pronoucing “Sarm” (meaning life); Man tries to live on, but cannot escape death. There comes the time when man fails to wake up. A dream is a mini-life within the mini-death in sleep we experience daily. To dream is to attempt to live; We are often startled by a dream and awake. We thus revive. And we are amazed by the vividness of dreams. Bad dreams and nightmares carry such vividness. I’ve long portrayed bad dreams. I’ve endeavored to depict the vividness of the moment when familiar things appear unfamiliar. It’s Dharma that I encountered while gazing into the darkness for a long time. Bodhidharma appeared to me like a boundary between dark and light, beautiful and ugly, life and death. In order to portray this peculiar saint, I’ve attempted to paint a portrait of a bad man made up of all the beautiful things of this world. This attempt led me to certain lights and colors for the first time in a long period of time and I began to draw trees. I was drawn more and more to trees. This Pennsylvania to which I moved last winter is abundant in trees of all kinds, as the place name “Penn’s Trees” may suggest. One can easily look down from an average two-story house standing along a gradually sloping hill, at tall trees forming forests. One can have a grand view of the trees standing in an endless line along the Delaware River. As one drives along the riverside, sunlight glitters dazzlingly over the shadows of trees covering the road. The way the trees along the road dance to the glittering beat twirling their arms and bodies reminds me of the ecstatic rituals performed by thousands of shamans together. There are many trees in the house where I live. While I cross the yard from the rooms where I stay and walk to the main building, I frequently stop to look up at the trees. The more I look at the trees, the more I get excited. I’m even mystified by their life force which has survived ages, not to mention the beauty of their variegated lines and curves. Besides, as I look at the trees which stand in grandeur revealing their whole careers, I come to think of the passage of time.

Exactly. Each of the Dharma trees is a narrative, alive and breathing. Where could there be a narrative more sacred than human life? Man is a narrative, and the tree resembling man is a narrative, too. Some of the Dharma trees send out ecstatic colours reminiscent of Nirvana. Each tree is a cosmos in itself. Man, birds and insects live there.The Dharma tree offers the only place where one could lounge comfortably in the vast spaces of the cosmos. There are no buldings, autmobiles or computers in the spaces surrounding Park’s Dharma trees. Only a single Dharma tree stands like the one and only god. The Dharma trees ceaselessly shake and sway with light or wind, myriad small branches spread out into space like nerve cells as if communicating with someone out there. It looks as if the Dharma tree will look differently tomorrow. Their forms will not be fixed anyway. The ramifications of Park’s Bodhodharma trees are due partly to the fact that the blueprints of his works are not that simple. They are not fixed trees but mobile. The majority of Dharma trees are made of branches rather than leaves, thereby giving the viewer a look of solidity and trustworthiness, and a posture of a seeker after truth. Bodhidharma is the tree, and the tree is Bodhidharma. If one looks at the work for a long time, one is made to feel like an enlightened one identifying himself with the tree. This is characteristic of the Dharma trees Park has created. In other words, Dharma trees are so huge that man and birds and such are dwarfed and almost invisible nestling in the trees. I gather that here Park hints at the grace and lesson offered by the tree, or else the identity between the tree (nature) and man or bird. One finally comes to realize that the world Park pursues is a world where man and nature merge. And that’s great.

The Dharma tree is a tree Park has created for the first time in the world. Park and the Dharma tree are not two separate entities but one – identical to us, and to myself, who looks at it. I realize again that the whole universe exists within the Dharma tree, nature’s reason or dispensation is nothing other than the present moment of my existence. As I leave the exhibition hall, I feel that, if we have the necessary worldly wisdom to live with a Dharma tree, it will be a happy life indeed. If winter comes, spring cannot be far away. So the spring will arrive shortly letting buds sprout over the Dharma tree.

Written by jinopark

March 22, 2010 at 12:49 pm

Posted in Dharma Tree

지노 개인전 – 달마나무

leave a comment »


초대합니다.
3월 3일 부터 3월 17일 까지
갤러리 피그에서 제 개인전을 엽니다.
오프닝 리셉션은 3월 3일 6시 입니다.
장소는
135-517
서울 강남구 청담동 93-11 KOON빌딩 B1 갤러리피그
문의전화는
02 545 7082 입니다.
전시와 관련 된 글이나 이미지를 보시려면
여기를 클릭하십시요.

Written by jinopark

March 19, 2010 at 8:15 pm

Posted in Dharma Tree

지노를 위한 명상 – 명본

leave a comment »

지노를 위한 명상
비구 명본 합장


우주의 문이 열리면서 순수한 정신 푸루샤(purusa)는 빛을 잃어버렸다. 그리고 그 빛이 사라진 자리는 본질적 욕망의 파라크리티(prakrti)가 차지해 버렸다. 순수의 시대가 사라지고 욕망의 시대가 열린 것이다.
히말라야 설산에서 잠들어버린 순수한 영혼들은 대지 속으로 숨어들어 나무의 정령이 되었다. 그들은 나무 속에서 새로운 꿈을 꾸며 긴 기다림의 시간들을 보내고 있다.
그러나 욕망의 시대를 사는 인간들 역시 자신의 욕구를 통제하지 못한 채 탐욕과 어리석음과 분노에 길들여지고 말았다. 동질적 이성을 잃어버린 채 파괴적 본성으로 치달았다. 자신의 사지가 갈기갈기 찢기어도 그 욕망의 바다에서 벗어날 수가 없었다.

길을 걸어가는 작가 지노.
지노는 유토피아를 꿈꾸는 작가다. 이 메마른 대지 위에 살면서, 인간의 순수정신이 상실된 이 시대 욕망의 어두운 뒤편에 숨어 있는 니르바라(nirvana)를 꿈꾸는 아티스트다.
처음에 그는 달마를 영혼의 메시아로 삼았다. 달마를 찾아 타클라마칸의 사막을 지나고, 천산산맥의 설산을 넘었다. 그의 앞을 가로막는 그 어떠한 난관도 불타오르는 그의 구도적 열정을 식힐 수 없었다.
마침내 그는 달마를 만났다. 그러나 그는 이미 순수한 달마가 아니었다. 달마는 정신의 세계 대신에 인간의 욕망세계를 선택한 것이다.
그가 만난 달마는 탐욕에 눈이 튀어나왔으며, 귀는 세상의 혼탁한 소리로 가득찼고, 입은 달콤한 꿀맛에 취해 있었다. 순수한 달마는 그 어디에도 존재하지 않는 것 같았다.
지노는 달마의 육신을 잘게 잘게 쪼개어 대지에 버리고, 달마의 붉은 피를 뽑아서 강물에 띄웠다. 그래도 순수한 달마는 보이지 않았다. 순수한 달마를 찾기보다도 더 아픈 현실과 더 깊은 고통만이 지노의 동무가 되어 있었다.
지노는 문득 자신의 내면을 관조하면서 지금까지의 기나긴 시간들을 되돌아 보았다. 그 옛날 인도 붓다가야의 깨달음의 나무 아래에서 있었다는 수행자를 생각하면서 깊은 명상에 잠긴 것이다.
마음은 바다처럼 고요하고 저 하늘에 순백의 달이 떠 있는 깊은 어느 날 밤, 그는 한 송이 꽃에서 달마를 보았다.
그것은 환희이자 기쁨이었다. 마침내 그는 순수한 달마를 만난 것이었다. 달마 얼굴의 백호 미간에 한 줄기 서광이 비쳤다. 달마의 일그러진 눈 속에 순수의 정신이 깃들었다. 달마의 입가에는 잔잔한 미소가 일어나고, 머리 위로는 수많은 대지의 꽃들이 피어나기 시작했다.
달마를 버림으로써 달마를 만난 것이다.

욕망의 시대에 순수정신의 맑은 미소를 만난 작가 지노.
지노는 자신의 내면을 바라보는 작가다. 현실의 온갖 타오르는 욕망 속에서 그 자신의 욕망을 잠재우고, 태초에 잃어버린 순수한 영혼을 찾아서 길을 다니던 그는 이 시대의 끝에서 달마를 만났다.
지노가 만난 달마는 세상의 끝없는 욕망과 집착과 아집을 벗어버린 모습이었다. 달마의 얼굴에는 더 이상의 욕망이 존재하지 않았다. 달마는 이미 순수한 세계를 보여주는 꽃이 되어 있었다. 달마의 눈은 깊은 호수보다 고요하며, 달마의 마음은 이미 순수 정신과 합일한 상태였다.
그곳에 그가 서 있다.
붓다가 깨달음의 나무 아래에서 고요한 니르바나를 성취하신 대지. 달마가 양자강을 갈대로 건너서 만난 어머니의 대지. 그 대지 위에서 지노는 맑고 순수한 정신을 알아차렸다.
마치 아침 이슬 같고, 물거품 같으며, 환상처럼 다가오는 아지랑이처럼 스쳐 지나가는 삶 속에서 잃어버린 정신을 찾아낸 그의 뜰 앞에는 이제 한 그루의 잣나무가 서 있다.
그 잣나무를 통하여 지노 박은 자연과 소통하고, 나무의 정령을 만나며, 우주와 합일되는 순수의 세계 속으로 들어간 것이다. 정신이 곧 우주와 하나임을 알아차린 순간 더 이상의 욕망도 없는 그 속에 달마가 있고, 이미 하나가 된 그 자리에 나무의 정령만 남은 것이다.
이제 지노는 그곳에 더 이상 없다.

옴 : 불교의 진언(眞言) 가운데 가장 위대한 것으로 여겨지는 신성한 음절.
푸루샤(purusa) : 인도 베다교(Veda敎)의 원인(原人)을 상징하는 인도철학상의 개념.
파라크리티(prakrti) : 물질적 원리. 순수 정신원리인 푸루샤(purusa)와 대치(對置).
니르바나(nirvana) : 열반(涅槃)의 원어.
붓다가야 : 인도 북동부 비하르주(州)에 있는 마을.

Written by jinopark

March 17, 2010 at 12:14 pm

Posted in Dharma Tree

달마나무, 하나의 문화적 충격 – 강우식

leave a comment »

지노 박의 달마나무 개인전

달마나무, 하나의 문화적 충격

강우식

3월이다. 내가 사는 집에도 봄볕이 왔다. 의자를 들어 베란다에 놓고 모처럼 해바라기를 한다. 해바라기는 무슨 특별한 이유가 있어 하는 게 아니고 그저 봄볕이 좋아서 무심코 하는 행위다. 순백의 백지와 같은 마음 자락으로 따뜻한 봄을 맞이하는 일이다. 마음을 비운 채 넋 놓고 있는 상태에서 나는 무뜩 지금 이 땅에 와 계신 달마는 어떤 봄맞이를 하고 계실까 궁금해졌다.

그 궁금증은 화가 지노 박의 개인전 ‘달마나무’ 때문이었다. ‘달마나무’란 생소하면서도 어딘가 흡인력이 있는 이름이 내 머리 속에 입력되어 있어서 전시회를 꼭 봐야 한다고 충동질하고 있었다. 지노 박이 미국에서 가져온 달마나무는 서울의 여러 곳에 심어져 있었다. 청담동 갤러리 피그에도 있었고 외환은행 평창동지점, 삼성동 백암아트홀 로비, 성북동 길상사에도 심어진다는 봄소식이었다. 나는 먼 길을 재촉하여 평창동 외환은행에 자리한 달마나무를 보러 갔다.

한마디로 지노 박의 달마나무 개인전은 하나의 신선한 문화적 충격이었다. 이제껏 나는 대다수 사람들이 그러하듯이 불화 중에서는 달마도를 그중 많이 보았었다. 그런 관람자로서의 경험이 축적된 달마도에 대한 고정관념이 내 속에는 있었다. 달마도에 대한 필법은 대개 일필휘지나 힘차고 담백한 용묵법이나 여백에의 강조를 기본으로 하는 것이라는 굳어진 지식과 관념화된 달마, 고착된 달마, 아무리 달마를 탈피하려 해도 달마를 벗어나지 못하는 달마를 수없이 보아왔다. 내가 만난 달마들은 달마이면서도 달마가 아닌 것이 없는 달마였다. 종교적인 뿌리에서 벗어나 보지 못한 달마였다. 불가적인 면에 너무 집착되어 있으므로 작품으로서의 완성도가 어딘지 삭감되는 달마라는 것이 솔직한 내 느낌이었다. 가령 세간에 떠도는 달마에 대한 많은 일화 가운데 내가 좋아하는 “부처도 보살도 몸을 몸으로 삼지 않는다. 목숨으로 목숨을 삼지 않으니, 법을 구할만하다.”는 달마의 달관을 어디에도 찾아보기 힘든 달마도가 수없이 세간을 떠도는 실정이었다. 보면 볼수록 식상하고 통속적인 달마도가 많다는 얘기다.

그런데 지노 박의 달마도는 전혀 새로운 달마였다. 이제껏 내가 보아온 달마가 아닌 달마였다. 누가 봐도 달마라고 일컬을 사람이 없는 달마였다. 여기에 작가 지노 박의 아티스트로서의 파격적인 힘이 있고 창조적인 생명력을 불어넣은 달마가 있다고 본다. 인도에서 온 달마가 아니라 한국에서 태어나 미국에 있다가 다시 한국에 와 있는 달마였다. 종래의 용묵법에 의해 그려진 달마가 아니라, 지노 박의 달마는 현대의 달마답게 디지털프린트로 나타난 달마였다. 연필로 드로잉하고 그 판에 컴퓨터를 통해서 화가가 색을 선택하여 다양한 낯빛으로 탄생한 지노 박만의 달마였다. 글로벌 달마였다. 지노 박은 ‘작가노트’에서 달마의 탄생을 다음과 같이 적고 있다. “오랫동안 어둠 속을 들여다보다 만난 것이 ‘달마’입니다. 달마는 제게 어둠과 밝음, 아름다움과 추함, 삶과 죽음의 경계로 여겨졌고, 그것을 그리기 위해 저는 ‘세상의 모든 아름다운 것들로 이루어진 악인의 초상’을 그리고자 합니다. 그리고 나무를 그리게 되었습니다. 그 뒤로 나무에 점점 빠져 지금은 나무만 그리고 있습니다.” 나는 지노 박이 달마를 그리게 된 동기를, ‘세상의 모든 아름다운 것들로 이루어진 악인의 초상’을 그리고자 했다는 고백에 전율한다. 지노 박이 프랑스에 가서 아르데꼬의 국립응용미술사학위나 세르지의 국립예술사학위를 취득하는 과정에서 비디오아트나 퍼포먼스를 전공한 화가답게 첨단적이고 실험적인 작품세계를 가지고 있는 줄은 그간의 개인 전시회를 통하여 어느 정도 익히 알고는 있었지만 달마라는 하나의 세계에 몰입하기까지는 나름의 작가적인 결단이 있었으리라 본다. 다시 말해서 지노 박의 달마는, 단순한 달마가 아니라 전혀 새롭게 창조되어진 다양한 색감의 달마이기까지의 많은 시간과 작가적 고뇌의 과정을 거쳐 탄생된 달마라는 것이다. 가령 지난해에 문화일보 갤러리에서 연 개인전은 ‘미궁’이라는 이름이었다. 그리스신화에 바탕을 두고 크놋소스의 미궁과 다양한 신화 세계를 재현하고 있었다. 신화시대에도 미궁이 있었듯이 그를 통해 미궁에서 방황하는 현대인의 삶의 방향을 상징하고자 했다. 다시 말해 서구문명의 주축이 되는 그리스신화를 고스란히 안고 지노 박은 동양의 세계로 돌아온 화가다. 나는 그가 그리고 있는 달마(세상의 모든 아름다운 것들로 이루어진 악인의 초상)에서 오늘날의 보들레르를 본다. 한 세대 전 을 통하여 당당히 기존의 시단을 뒤흔들어놓은, 그리고 악의 미학을 찬미한 보들레르를 본다. 보들레르가 ‘피카소론’을 썼듯이 지노 박의 그림에는 문학적인 상상력이 있다. 시가 있다. 지노 박에게는 그런 당당함과 새로움의 세계의 미학을 가지려는 작가정신이 있음을 본다. 단순히 서구의 미학에서 동양의 미학으로의 귀환이 아니라 동서가 혼융되고 교감하는 세계를 그림 속에 펼쳐 보인다. 화가로서 지노 박은 스스로가 말했듯이 경계인이다. 어둠과 밝음, 아름다움과 추함, 삶과 죽음, 동양과 서양, 신화와 종교 사이에 존재하는 경계인인 것이다. 경계인으로서 서양도 두루 보고 동양도 섭렵한 세계가 육화(肉化)되어 나타난 것이 달마다. 보들레르처럼 지노 박도 경계인이다.

지노 박의 달마를 보자. 달마는 시초부터 험상궂게 생겼다. 도를 닦기 위해 9년이나 감옥보다 더 지독한 면벽을 하고, 그것도 모자라 잠을 쫓으려고 스스로 눈꺼풀을 잘라내 왕방울만한 눈을 만들어 무섭게 생겼다. 달마는 상식적으로 판단하면 어딘지 이상한 인물이었다. 스스로 자해행위를 하고 득도를 위해 9년이나 면벽을 하며 자신을 묶어놓는 정신병자 같은 사람이었다. 악마적 취향이 있는 인물이었다. 그런 달마를 지노 박은 더욱 험상궂게 만들었다. 살갗은 온통 썩어 문드러져 추하고 무서운 악인으로 창조했다. 이렇게 일반인들이 기피하는 인물의 전형을 예술가들은 왜 즐겨 창조하고 있을까. 문학적으로 이런 현상을 우리는 “필록테테스philoctetes의 농상(膿傷)“이라 한다. 필록테테스는 그리스의 신궁이었다. 그는 불행하게도 트로이 원정 때 독사에게 발을 물리게 된다. 물린 발가락은 이내 곪고 썩어서 사람들이 접근하지 못할 정도로 심한 악취를 풍겼다. 마침내 필록테테스는 농상 때문에 격리되어 10년 동안 무인도에 가 있게 된다. 하지만 트로이를 공략하기 위해서는 반드시 필요한 인물이었다. 활을 잘 쏘는 명궁이 무엇보다 필요하므로 어쩔 수 없이 다시 부르게 되는 데서 생긴 용어다. 오늘날 예술작품에는 이와 같은 병적증후군이 많이 그려지고 있다. 그 까닭은 작품을 통하여 수용자에게 무서운 병에 대한 경각심을 불러일으키고 충격을 주어 현대 사회가 지닌 부조리성을 파헤치려는 데 그 목적이 있다. 다시 말해 예술가는 사회적으로 별로 대우를 못 받는 존재이지만 반면 사회는 불건전하더라도 예술적인 창조력을 필요로 한다는 역설의 의미가 있다. 지노 박의 달마도도 아마 작가의 의식 속 ”필록테테스의 농상“이 표출된 것이리라.

지노 박의 달마도는 악마미가 깃든 바탕 위에 매우 아름답고 환상적이고 때로는 신비스럽게 화장(색칠)을 했다. 그가 그린 달마의 얼굴은 마치 어린 시절 소풍 가서 하는 보물찾기처럼 미궁이거나 보물상자 같다. 그 속에는 별도 있고 바다도 있고 불타는 사막도 있고 꽃과 풀잎들도 있다. 머리칼은 마치 울창한 나무로 둘러싸인 숲의 물결을 이루기도 한다. 우주의 삼라만상이 얼굴 속에 존재하고 그것들은 창세기처럼 무질서 속의 질서를 유지하고 있다. 남태평양의 어느 섬에서 만난 얼굴 전체가 기호와 알 수 없는 문양으로 문신된 마우이 족 청년처럼 샤먼적이기도 하다. 그 살갗 위에 디지털 프린트로 다양한 색깔을 입히고 있다. 그런가 하면 아메리커니즘적인 경박미와 유머러스도 있다. 그 중에서도 달마 얼굴의 눈은 자못 신비롭다. 한쪽 눈은 더 이상 확대될 수 없을 정도로 원(무한)으로 팽창되어 있고 그 속에 큰 별이 눈동자로 박혀 상징처럼 무언가를 투시하고 있다. 다른 한쪽 눈은 작은 눈 속에 원형의 축소된 몇 겹의 우주로 채워져 있다. 언밸런스한 두 눈에서 나는 무한대의 우주를 만난다. 작은 눈 속에 있는 몇 겹의 우주 중 하나가 확대되어 보여주는 것이 별 눈동자가 있는 눈이기도 하다. 또 미세한 점들은 태어나지 않은 우주의 정자 같기도 하다. 아니 아직 태어나지 않은 우주알이다. 그것들은 만화처럼 유머러스하고 때로는 심오한 철학이나 종교처럼 보는 이에 따라서 다양한 상상력을 일으킬 것이다. 나는 지노 박이 그린 달마를 보며 저 달마처럼 재미있고 때로는 심오한 눈을 가졌으면 얼마나 행복할까 마음먹어 본다. 저런 눈을 가지고 미래를 투시하고 다가올 운명이랄까 그런 것들도 미리 예감하면 좋으리라. 불가에서는 일체유심조-모두가 마음먹기 달렸다고 하지 않던가.

그 후 지노 박은 이제 인간 달마에서 나무의 세계로 옮겨간다. 달마가 외형이라면 외형 속에 깃든 모든 삼라만상은 내면의 기록이었다. 그 내면 중의 하나인 나무가 겉으로 드러나고 달마(인간)는 나무속에 사는 내형적 존재가 된다. 나는 나무를 보며 나무가 왜 신성시되는 것인지 궁금해 한 적이 있다. 가령 나무에 대한 인간의 경배는 쉽게 찾아볼 수 있는 것으로 우리의 건국신화인 단군신화에도 신단수인 박달나무가 나타나며 신라에서는 임금이 명산을 찾아 해마다 제사를 지냈을 뿐만 아니라 우리네 사는 마을 어디서나 당산목이라 불리는 신성시하는 신령스러운 나무들을 쉽게 만날 수 있다. 이런 현상이나 믿음은 비단 우리나라에만 있는 것이 아니다. 세계적으로 유포설화처럼 널리 퍼져 있다. 나무는 우주목(宇宙木)이라 하여 대개는 한 나라의 중심에 자리잡고 있음을 본다. 이처럼 태고적부터 인간이 나무를 신성시하는 의식은 언제부터 생긴 것일까. 인간과 나무 사이에 어떤 일이 벌어졌던 것일까 하는 생각을 갖게 만든다. 그 유추의 끝자락에는 오늘 우리가 보는 식물체로서의 나무가 아니고 어느 시기에 나무가 막대한 힘을 지니고 인간 위에 군림하던 때가 있지 않았나 하는 동화 같은 상상도 해 본 적이 있었다. 나무가 어쩌면 움직이는 생물체였을지도 모른다는 생각 말이다. 근일 나는 영화 ‘아바타’를 관람한 적이 있다. 이 영화 속에서 내가 상상했던 거와 비슷한 일이 현실로 재현된 것을 보았었다. 거대한 나무가 나비 족이라는 부족의 중심에 있어 모든 것을 묵묵히 통제하고 지배할 뿐만 아니라 그 나무를 제거하려는 인간과 맞서 싸우는 것을 보았었다.

지노 박이 창조한 달마나무도 그런 신성한 색채를 띠고 있다. 달마나무를 관상하며 달마가 나무가 되고 다시 달마와 나무가 통합하여 달마나무가 된 작품을 보면서 이 작가가 나무에 대하여 얼마나 많은 명상을 하였을까를 생각하며 나는 지노 박의 ‘작가노트’를 떠올렸다. “제가 만난 나무들 중에는 잊혀 지지 않는 나무들이 많습니다. 새의 날개처럼 꺾어진 가지를 가진 나무, 날렵한 붓놀림으로 그린 듯한 나무, 삶의 의지의 화신인 것처럼 하늘로 수많은 가지를 올려붙인 나무, 비현실적인 초록색으로 요정처럼 눈밭에 선, 수만의 연두빛 잎새를 팔랑거리던 나무(중략), 이렇게 다양한 나무들이 들려주는 이야기는 하나하나가 밤을 새워 얘기해도 끝내지 못할 겁니다. 한 줄기로 이루어진 이야기가 아니라 나무가 가지 치듯이 사방으로 뻗어나가는 이야기이기 때문입니다. 나무는 입체를 이루고 서 있는 살아 숨쉬는 서사입니다. 제가 언젠가 이루고자 하는 ‘다면서사조형체’의 모형입니다.”

그렇다. 지노 박의 달마나무는 나무 하나하나가 살아 숨 쉬는 서사였다. 사람이 사는 일보다 더 신성한 서사가 어디 있는가. 인간이 서사이고 인간을 닮은 나무가 서사였다. 달마나무들의 어떤 것들은 니르바나에 들은 듯 황홀한 색채를 나타내는 것도 있지만 다수의 달마나무들은 하나하나가 낱낱의 우주였다. 그 속에 사람도 새도 곤충들도 산다. 광활한 우주공간에 기댈 곳이라고는 오직 달마나무밖에 없다. 지노 박이 만든 달마나무 공간에는 빌딩도 자동차도 컴퓨터도 없다. 있는 것이라고 한 그루 달마나무가 유일신처럼 서 있을 뿐이다. 달마나무들은 빛으로 때로는 바람으로 끊임없이 흔들린다. 무수히 많은 잔가지들은 마치 신경세포처럼 어딘가 교신하는 것처럼 공간 속에 퍼져 있다. 아마 달마나무들은 내일이면 오늘과 다른 모습으로 있을 듯이 보인다. 결코 고정된 모습은 아닐 것이다. 지노 박의 달마나무가 주는 다변화된 느낌은 작품 구도가 단순하지 않다는 데 있다. 고정된 나무가 아니라 운동성을 띤 나무다. 그리고 대다수의 달마나무들은 잎보다 가지들로 형성되어 보는 이들에게 견고성과 믿음을 준다. 마치 구도자의 자세다. 달마가 나무고 나무가 달마다. 작품을 오래 주시하고 있으면 내가 달마나무고 달마나무가 나인 깨우침에 도달하려는 각자(覺者)의 경지에 몰입하게 만든다. 이것이 지노 박이 창조한 달마나무의 특성이다. 즉 달마나무는, 나무는 거대하고 사람이나 새 등속들은 달마나무 속에 깃들어 있는데 눈에 잘 띄지 않을 정도로 작다. 이것은 지노 박이 나무가 주는 은혜나 교훈을 암시하려는 의도로도 여겨진다. 아니면 나무(자연)와 인간, 새들과의 동일성을 나타낸 듯하다. 자연과 인간이 하나로 혼융되는 세계가 바로 지노 박이 추구하는 세계임을 깨닫게 된다. 대단하다.

달마나무는 세상에서 지노 박이 처음으로 만든 유일한 나무고 지노 박과 달마나무는 불이(不二)가 아닌 하나이자 그 나무를 보는 우리며 그리고 나다. 달마나무 속에 삼라만상이 깃들어 있고 그 자연의 이치와 섭리가 바로 내가 사는 오늘임을 새삼 깨닫는다. 나는 전시장을 나서며 우리가 이 세상을 살아가는 요량인 슬기로서 달마나무 한그루를 가지고 살면 참으로 행복한 인생이 될 것이라는 믿음을 가져본다. 겨울이 가면 봄이 머지않으니 곧 봄이 와 달마나무에도 싹이 틀 것이다.

Written by jinopark

March 13, 2010 at 9:17 pm

Posted in Dharma Tree

Dharma Tree: Author’s Note

leave a comment »

Dharma Tree: Author’s Note

By Jino Park

They say to sleep is none other than to experience a mini-death. Each day we fall asleep and die, each day we wake up and revive. It is said the Korean word “Saram” (meaning man) is another way of pronoucing “Sarm” (meaning life); Man tries to live on, but cannot escape death. There comes the time when man fails to wake up. A dream is a mini-life within the mini-death in sleep we experience daily. To dream is to attempt to live; We are often startled by a dream and awake. We thus revive. And we are amazed by the vividness of dreams. Bad dreams and nightmares carry such vividness. I’ve long portrayed bad dreams. I’ve endeavored to depict the vividness of the moment when familiar things appear unfamiliar. It’s Bodhidharma that I encountered while gazing into the darkness for a long time. Bodhidharma appeared to me like a boundary between dark and light, beautiful and ugly, life and death. In order to portray this peculiar saint, I’ve attempted to paint a portrait of a bad man made up of all the beautiful things of this world. This attempt led me to certain lights and colors for the first time in a long period of time and I began to draw trees. I was drawn more and more to trees. This Pennsylvania to which I moved last winter is abundant in trees of all kinds, as the place name “Penn’s Trees” may suggest. One can easily look down from an average two-story house standing along a gradually sloping hill, at tall trees forming forests. One can have a grand view of the trees standing in an endless line along the Delaware River. As one drives along the riverside, sunlight glitters dazzlingly over the shadows of trees covering the road. The way the trees along the road dance to the glittering beat twirling their arms and bodies reminds me of the ecstatic rituals performed by thousands of shamans together. There are many trees in the house where I live. While I cross the yard from the rooms where I stay and walk to the main building, I frequently stop to look up at the trees. The more I look at the trees, the more I get excited. I’m even mystified by their life force which has survived ages, not to mention the beauty of their variegated lines and curves. Besides, as I look at the trees which stand in grandeur revealing their whole careers, I come to think of the passage of time.

At one time or another the trees must have soared towards the sky and the sun, spreading wide their boughs and branches like an awning. They stood thick and green, or they struggled with the tornado that suddenly assailed them, overpowering them to thrust their arms into the storm, only to break them apart. Then new branches appeared among powerless and broken boughs and branches. Vines climbed up the new branches. At long last new leaves came out, and birds built their nests among the branches. Trees document graphically all the vicissitudes of life. Among the trees I’ve met, there are trees I can never forget. There are trees that spread their branches like bird wings; trees that look like the adroit brush-strokes of a master of oriental painting; trees that extend numberless branches toward the sky like incarnations of the will to life; trees that flutter glittering green leaves, standing like faeries in the snow-covered field, trees collapsing into the river; numberless broken tree trunks fallen over mountain slopes and withering in the sun; trees that resemble thighbones; thousands of slender branches of willow trees lying in one direction indicated by the wind on the morning following a stormy night. Stories told by these trees are each a story that one cannot finish telling overnight. For they are not stories that proceed in one direction or along one line as in a textbook, but they are stories etched over the whole bodies of the trees and spread out along the boughs and branches in all directions. Like this, trees are narratives that exist in three dimensions, alive and breathing. Incidentally, they form a model for a multi-dimensional narrative sculpture, which I hope to achieve some day.

I endeavor not to be efficient while painting trees. I paint slowly like trees. Thinking and acting efficiently turns the act of painting into pain and labor from which one would only wish to escape. One must not be efficient at least while painting trees. For trees do not grow efficiently. Painting a tree is like walking over a field covered with the first snow, facing the sun. Since there’s no road, there’s no map or plan. One makes a path as one treads over the snow facing the sun. One puts a dot or draws a line as one treads the snowfield slowly, step by step. One acts out a tree rather than drawing a tree. One cannot draw erroneously or wrongfully because one does not copy the tree. To draw a tree is to imagine a tree. My way of drawing a tree is to remember the tree I met once and to imagine the times and seasons it had spent. Above all, I imagine the way it grows. I imagine and follow the way a branch extends in keeping with a rule, whether cross-wise or otherwise. As a small branch extends and bends, it courts the wind more and more. The wind forms a new rule, and the tree sways in the wind, bends or breaks. Clouds rush into the tree. The sun rises and the moon fades behind the hanging clouds. Stars pour down. At last a tree appears on the paper. It turns out to be a Dharma tree.

Written by jinopark

March 13, 2010 at 2:33 pm

Posted in Dharma Tree